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Unknown Clients on Router ?

Question

So today I was messing about with the router, and noticed some strange names for some of the wireless connections, I have managed to match up some of the MAC addresses to some devices but there is one who calls its self "i-leik-egz" that I cannot seem to find, I th9ought that name was very strange!

 

For now I have turned on parental controls and denied access 24/7 to what ever that is connecting to the router.

 

I have a Asus RT N56U with the latest firmware installed.

 

So i am just wondering if there is anyway to find out what this is or just wait till something/someone tries to connect and they cannot ?

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Sounds like someone (who likes eggs) connecting with a personal device after guessing your password.

Your router supports MAC address filtering, so I'd just set up a "white list" of known MAC addresses for your specific devices and exclude everything else.

http://www.asus.com/support/FAQ/1011426/

However, if you're still curious about figuring out what kind of devices are connected, there are some neat networking tools available for iOS, such as Fing, that allow your iPad (or iPhone) to identify every device visible on the same wifi network.

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just been looking at the fing tool and it does not even show this "person" on the list of connected devices, also not sure how someone would guess the PW but still does not hurt to change it every now and again.

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I had the same issue with an Asus router recently, and even after ramping up the passwords, some still seemed to be getting on, which makes me wonder if the router tells lies.

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Sometimes a password is not enough.

You can change the SSID and hide the SSID; if they don't know what the name of your wifi network is, they cannot connect.

MAC filtering should be absolute though, as the chances of them spoofing the correct MAC address should be zero.

I'd combine both of these to be certain.

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Hiding the SSID is fairly useless these days as you can still scan for the hidden networks (Acrylic WiFi), and if you really want to get on then you obviously know what you're doing :P

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